Posted by: Thomas Drinkard | December 13, 2014

A New Fable for Christmas – Part 3

The shepherd boy, Haman, and his friend, the angel Jude, are waiting for the shepherds to return from their visit to Bethlehem. *******************************************************

“Please show me the stable scene again. There’s something about the sense of peace and completion there that I need,” Haman said.

As he looked in the direction of Bethlehem, the stable appeared once more, but the shepherds were no longer there. Except for the animals, only the Christ Child, Mary and Joseph were in the drafty structure.

“The shepherds are gone,” Haman said.

“Yes, they’ll be back here in a few hours, but others will be visiting the Child soon,” Jude said.

“Who?”

“Have you noticed the special star? The unusually brilliant one standing still over the town?”

“Yes, how could I miss it? Out here in the long nights, it’s been as bright as several stars together, but what has that got to do with someone else visiting the Child?”

“Three wise men, or wizards some would say, have been predicting the appearance of the star and the birth of the Holy Child. They are from lands far away, but they will come soon and pay homage to Him, bringing precious gifts,” Jude said.

“Will I be able to see them, too?”

“Yes. I’ll ask Gabe if I can take you there.”

Haman stood, stretched and dropped a dry branch on the guttering fire. Dawn would be coming in a few hours. The only sounds other than the low hissing of the campfire came from restless sheep. Jude was silent as the boy fed the glowing coals and returned to the blanket where he’d been sitting.

“Jude, you know so much about these things. I can hardly believe that I’m talking to an angel, but from what you’ve shown me, it must be true. Tell me about the Baby, his mother and father. Gabriel said He was ‘…a Savior, which is Christ the Lord.’ The rabbi has spoken of a Messiah that would come to us and you have spoken of Isaiah’s prophecy. Is this baby the One?”

“Yes. He is the Christ, the Messiah. His mother is a young woman named Mary, but the man you see with them is not the child’s father. He is a good man, a carpenter named Joseph. His family is from the ancient family of King David. That’s why they are in Bethlehem. The child is the Son of God. His name is Jesus.”

Haman was silent. The words of the angel were simple, but the ideas were like a giant rainstorm in parched land. They flooded the boy’s mind and created more and more questions as he stared at the stable scene, still shining in the open field.

“Haman, get up. You are needed. Gabe told me,” Jude said.

It was as if someone had shaken his shoulder to wake him from slumber.

“What? What can I do?”

“When your uncle returns, with the other shepherds, ask him for permission to go into Bethlehem to see the Holy Child. He will approve. Then you and I will go. Your uncle won’t see me, but I’ll be with you.”

Within minutes, the sounds of men approaching were obvious. Their words became clearer as they drew nearer. They fed more wood on the fire and seemed to compete to tell Haman what wonders they’d seen. The boy listened to them as they described the stable scene. What they told was what Jude had shown him.

“Uncle, Bethlehem isn’t far and dawn is coming soon. May I go and see this Holy Child you’ve visited?” Haman said.

As Jude had predicted, the older shepherd gave permission, and taking only as small water skin, Haman was on the way.

As dawn began to redden the hills to the east, the angel’s figure, walking beside him became clearer.

No, a boy of his apparent age wouldn’t be wearing a cloak as brilliantly white—not for long anyway. Jude was about as tall as Haman. His hair was blonde and came to his shoulders. His eyes were pale blue. At least they seemed to be that color, but the color darkened as the sun rose.

“Why am I needed in Bethlehem?” Haman said.

“You must be there when the wizards come. You’ll understand; now hurry.”

Trusting his angel friend, Haman picked up the pace.

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Responses

  1. Loving this! The format is simple and quickly read and the subject is timely (of course, at Christmas) and relevant. I can see it as an animated/claymation cartoon like “The Little Drummer Boy”.


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